Meet Kate Dundon, our Project Manager

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To continue our series of profiles on members of the NELA Newspapers collaborators, meet Kate Dundon, the Project Manager of the NELA Newspaper Pilot Project. She is working to design and document sustainable standards and procedures for the larger project of digitizing the collection of Northeast LA newspapers held at Oxy.

Kate has worked at Occidental College in various roles over the past year, including Project Archivist and Instruction and Research Consultant. She earned an MA in Archives and Public History from NYU, and a Masters in Information and Library Science from Long Island University, both in 2011. Raised in Pacific Grove, CA, Kate has a strong interest in California history, and is thrilled to be learning about the history of Los Angeles through this project.

Meet Antonio Castillo, President of the Highland Park Heritage Trust

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To continue our series of profiles on members of the NELA Newspapers collaborators, meet Antonio Castillo, President of the Highland Park Heritage Trust. Antonio is one of the primary members of the NELA Newspapers Leadership Committee, and has recently helped the group secure a space for a presentation on the project.

Antonio is a long-time resident and active member of the Northeast Los Angeles community. As an urban planner, he has studied many communities and understands the importance of advocating for the recognition and appreciation of the unique history of each community as a means of shaping collective identity and managing change.

With over 13 years of professional experience, Antonio has held positions in the private, public, and non-profit sectors in urban planning, architectural design, and historic preservation. Antonio earned an A.S. degree in Architectural Technology and Historic Preservation from Los Angeles Trade Technical College, a B.S. degree in Urban and Regional Planning from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, and is currently a Master Degree candidate in Public Administration at California State University, Northridge.

The NELA Exhibit

Last week the Special Collection Department asked Kate and I to set up an exhibit of the NELA project for Alumni weekend . Kate and I worked for hours deciding what would be placed in the exhibit, the lay out, and creating labels for each piece. I am a crafter so the labeling and making cards portion of this project was really fun for me. We decided on placing 5 loose newspapers; one of the Highland Park News-Herald & Journal, two of the Occidental Weekly, and two of the Eagle Rock Sentinel. We also placed a bound volume of newspapers from the Highland Park Post Dispatch and one reel of microfilm. The selection process was mainly focusing on what was eye-catching or interesting to read. In addition, we included a circulation map of NELA newspapers, so that viewers could see where newspapers in the case were distributed. Our end goal for this exhibit was to create awareness about the NELA Project, in addition to visually providing a representative sample of the materials we will be working with. Here are some pictures of the exhibit!

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NELA Community Engagement at Lummis Day

I recently attended the 2013 Lummis Day, and had the chance to speak with several members of the Highland Park Heritage Trust and the Eagle Rock Valley Historical Society about the NELA Newspaper project. I truly enjoyed hearing people’s stories of growing up in the area, and their historical research projects involving the region.

I was particularly happy to have met Louisa Van Leer, a Highland Park-based artist,  architect, and HPHT board member who created a self-guided tour of Mount Angeles, which is near York Boulevard and Figueroa Street. Louisa told me that many of the streets on this hill were named after famous Suffragists and Abolitionists by Cora Scott Pond-Pope, who helped develop Mount Angeles in the early 20th century. Read more about Louisa’s tour, and the history of this unique neighborhood at stairstreetghosts.blogspot.com.

Map of “Stair Street Ghosts” walking tour, created by Louisa Van Leer, 2011

Meet our Student Worker, Aneesah

IMG_20120705_143929To begin our series of profiles on members of the NELA Newspapers collaborators meet, Aneesah Ettress. She is a rising sophomore at Occidental College. Her majors are Diplomacy and World Affairs and Economics, and she will be minoring in French. She has traveled to Haiti twice for missionary work, having just recently returned from her second trip on June 10th 2013. She is a member of various clubs at Oxy and currently a Black History Month Co-Chair for BSA. As a first year Aneesah was hired as a Peer Research Assistant and has enjoyed being a part of the Scholarship Technology Department at Oxy.

Aneesah’s  work has been in conducting focus groups to help improve the Occidental College Library Website; she will be continuing this project in Fall 2013. Hired as a student worker for the NELA Newspaper Pilot Project for Summer 2013, she will be examining bound, loose, and microfilm copies of NELA newspapers; in addition to other tasks related to the project.

“It will be interesting to see the history of NorthEast Los Angeles as I have grown up near it in Monrovia, California”, says Aneesah. “In addition, I am looking forward to seeing Occidental College in some of these newspapers as it will deepen my knowledge of the institution and the surrounding community.”

Copyright research workflow

As noted in my last post on copyright, I have been researching ways to determine the copyright status of each title in our collection. Using these resources, I created this workflow for our new student worker, Aneesah, to use when investigating the copyright of a given newspaper.

NELA Newspapers: steps for determining copyright status

For publications from 1923-1977:

  1. Look carefully for a copyright notice on the material. Look at several copies of the entire newspaper at several regular intervals.

  1. If there is no copyright notice, it is in the public domain.

  1. If there is a copyright notice on publications from 1964-1977, they are NOT in the public domain. Copyright status is 95 years after the publication date. Note the date on which copyright will expire.

  1. If there is a copyright notice on publications from 1923-1963, you need to find out if copyright was renewed:

    1. Search the Catalog of Copyright Entries on the Online Books Page (UPENN). If you don’t find the title, it wasn’t renewed, it is in the public domain.

    2. If you do find the title, the copyright was renewed, and is NOT in the public domain. Copyright status is 95 years after the publication date. Note the date on which copyright will expire.

For publications from 1978-March 1, 1989:

  1. Look carefully for a copyright notice on the material.

  1. If there is no notice, find out if copyright was registered. Search the Catalog of Copyright Entries on the Online Books Page (UPENN).

    1. If it was not registered within 5 years of publication, it is in the public domain.

    2. If it was registered within 5 years of publication, it is NOT in the public domain. Copyright status is 95 years after the publication date. Note the date on which copyright will expire.

  1. If there is a notice, it is NOT in the public domain. Copyright status is 95 years after the publication date. Note the date on which copyright will expire.

For publications from March 1, 1989-present:

  1. All content is covered by copyright for 95 years after the publication date. Note the date on which copyright will expire.

[This workflow was created using Peter B. Hirtle’s Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States (Cornell Copyright Information Center), and Judy G. Russell’s Copyright & the Newspaper Article  (The Legal Genealogist).]